Daily Archives: August 28, 2017


How a Far Left Candidate Won in a Deep Red State

Governing has the article How a Far Left Candidate Won in a Deep Red State.

The new mayor of Jackson, Miss., may offer striking evidence of a nationwide trend.

This is the beginning of my research into Jackson, Mississippi. My interest was keeked by comments of Ajamu Baraka in the previous post On Contact: Agenda of Hate with Ajamu Baraka.

The article on Jackson in Wikipedia has a rather ironic first topic after the introduction.

The region that is now the city of Jackson was historically part of the large territory occupied by the Choctaw Nation, the historic culture of the Muskogean-speaking indigenous peoples who had inhabited the area for thousands of years before European encounter.
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Under pressure from the U.S. government, the Choctaw Native Americans agreed to removal after 1830 from all of their lands east of the Mississippi River under the terms of several treaties.


On Contact: Agenda of Hate with Ajamu Baraka

YouTube has the video On Contact: Agenda of Hate with Ajamu Baraka.

On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges examines the rise of white, right-wing hate groups with Ajamu Baraka, Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies and the Green Party’s nominee for Vice President in the 2016 election. RT Correspondent Anya Parampil looks at the profusion of white supremacist groups in America.

This episode is not only about negative aspects of what is happening. Finding out about Jackson, Mississippi was encouraging. Jackson is something I’ll want to learn more about.


Should the rich be taxed more? A new paper shows unequivocally yes

The Guardian has the article Should the rich be taxed more? A new paper shows unequivocally yes.

Measuring tax paid against share of income earned and wealth owned reveals the US tax system has become less progressive – and in Britain it is a similar picture

I have said for a long time that the factoid “The top 1% of earners in the UK accounts for 27% of income tax receipts” is meaningless. Tell me what percentage of the income the 1% earn before we judge the fairness of paying 27% of the tax.

Finally, this article alludes to that number even if it doesn’t present it in a simple fashion.