Mystery of why arteries harden may have been solved, say scientists   Recently updated !


The Guardian has the article Mystery of why arteries harden may have been solved, say scientists.

Stiffening can also occur as calcium becomes deposited in fatty plaques in the arteries – a condition called atherosclerosis.

Interesting finding. I also wonder how excess Vitamin D impacts calcification. Doctors are so worried about vitamin D deficiency, that they may be too successful in getting people to boost their levels of Vitamin D.

Medshadow.org has the article Vitamin D: Pros and Cons from 2014.

How much is too much? Observational studies suggest that shooting for blood levels above 50 ng/mL may be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, cardiovascular disease and an increased risk of death. Dr. Manson says, “Some vitamin D is good, but more is not necessarily better. People should understand that there is limited research on long-term intakes above 2,000 IU daily. If they are regularly taking 3,000-4,000 IU per day, even if those levels may not have been linked to adverse events, we do not know if the benefits outweigh the risks long-term because we don’t have the evidence.”

Massive doses of 10,000 IU daily or more can put you at risk of developing high calcium levels in the blood, or in the urine, which could cause calcification of blood vessels, kidney problems and kidney stones, especially if calcium intake is also high.

In my case, I did have recurring kidney stones. What made me question the Vitamin D problem is that I was diagnosed with an abdominal calcification that could not be operated on because of its location. Doctors were pushing high doses of Vitamin D on me because I had low blood levels of Vitamin D. When my urologist discovered the doses of Vitamin D I was taking, he said “No wonder you have kidney stones.” I stopped taking Vitamin D altogether. My kidney stones are not recurring in the time frame they did before. My abdominal calcification is also shrinking of its own accord.

I am certainly not extrapolating from my one case to anything other people should or should not do. I may be completely wrong about cause and effect. However, as long as it seems to be working for me, I will keep doing what I am doing.

I also might mention that I have had heart bypass surgery involving 4 arteries.

Leave a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.