How Swedes and Norwegians Broke the Power of the ‘1 Percent’


The Nation Of Change has the article, How Swedes and Norwegians Broke the Power of the ‘1 Percent’.

While many of us are working to ensure that the Occupy movement will have a lasting impact, it’s worthwhile to consider other countries where masses of people succeeded in nonviolently bringing about a high degree of democracy and economic justice. Sweden and Norway, for example, both experienced a major power shift in the 1930s after prolonged nonviolent struggle. They “fired” the top 1 percent of people who set the direction for society and created the basis for something different.

Didn’t the U.S. have a major power shift in the 1930s?  How come the Swedes and Norwegians have managed to keep their shift longer than we did?

I don’t think the following articles are the answer, but they do show how far we have to go.

From Truth Out we have, Wall Street: The Candidate’s Friend.

President Obama may talk a good populist game and even kick some corporate butt when he goes on the attack against Wall Street “fat cats.” Yet he still enjoys the company of bankers — see our “On Democracy” essay on the subject — and for all their grumbling about his policies, the investment community is coming up with significant cash for his re-election; the kind of change they believe in.

The article from Truth Out points to the article from the Sunlight Foundation, Political Contributions from Financial Sector Increased 700% Since 1990.

A new analysis prepared by the Sunlight Foundation shows that wealthy financial sector donors gave $178.2 million in political contributions in 2010, more than ten times what they gave 20 years ago. More than any other industry, individuals from the finance, insurance and real estate (FIRE) sector, particularly those in securities and investments, are the key drivers of the overall growth of elite donors, or what Sunlight calls The Political One Percent of the One Percent.


                                                                                

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